NURS FPX 4060   Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

Health Promotion Plan Presentation

NURS FPX 4060 Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

Peeches Headlam

Capella University

NURS-FPX4060: Coordinating Patient-Centered Care 

August 29, 2021

SLIDE 2. Introduction 

Hello, everyone! Welcome. My name is Peaches Headlam,  and I am a community health nurse. I am working on the Health Promotion Plan on tobacco cessation in the high school to create a healthier environment on their campus. We meet once a month to review previous goals, assess progress, and adjust as required. We also give education to anybody who wishes to attend, and we would welcome more volunteers to assist us in developing successful strategies and achieving our aim. Today, we’ll talk about our anti-tobacco and anti-nicotine campaign, why now is a good time to stop, and our goals and progress.

As you may be aware, one out of every four young adults use tobacco or tobacco substitutes such as vapes and hookah. I’m sure you weren’t surprised; individuals can be seen engaging in these behaviors all around campus. Tobacco-containing products are used by over 900 million individuals globally, and tobacco is responsible for one out of every ten fatalities. Tobacco and nicotine users are more prone to acquire malignancies, COPD, peripheral artery disease, and heart disease in any form. There are a variety of reasons why people would utilize these items. Peer pressure, the people you hang out with, alcohol intake, and even experimentation are all factors to consider (Ricotta et al., 2000).  This presentation is a health promotion strategy with a measurable and realistic aim. Our target period is 60 days, with a 30-day progress review, and we’ll evaluate progress weekly using anonymous questionnaires.

        SLIDE 3.  Health Promotion Plan

NURS FPX 4060 Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

The main objective is to give you the resources you need to enhance your health and quality of life. The goal of this plan is to provide you with the knowledge and resources you need to quit smoking. This is accomplished via the use of resources, tools, and objectives. I realized we needed to establish a strategy with achievable and measurable targets when I was asked to assist plan to see if we could minimize tobacco and alternatives. Because the strategy would have to be based on research, it would have to be evidence-based. As a result, I’ve come up with at least three illnesses connected to the usage of cigarettes and nicotine. Then, collectively, we’d go through those disorders and make posters and brochures to raise awareness about tobacco smoking and the problems it causes. We had to reduce it down to three when you returned with seven options. You also provided me with a substantial amount of supporting documentation—excellent work! COPD, Heart Disease and Stroke, and Cancer were the three diseases we picked (Loukas et al., 2016). I also asked you to go through the Healthy People 2020/2030 website and come up with three objectives to utilize in setting goals for our plan, which you did. On these slides, we’ll go over the facts in this plan.

SLIDE 4. Heart Disease and Stroke

Smoking is a leading cause of CVD, accounting for one out of every four fatalities from the disease. Smoking can cause your triglycerides (a kind of fat in your blood) to rise and your “good” cholesterol to drop. Blood becomes sticky and clots more easily, obstructing blood flow to the heart and brain. Damage to blood vessel lining cells increases plaque accumulation (fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other chemicals) in blood vessels, which can lead to blood vessel hardening and constriction (Smoking and Heart Disease and Stroke, 2021). It has been proven that not using nicotine products or stopping if you are already a smoker can greatly lower your risk of having a stroke.

 COPD

COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a set of illnesses that cause airflow obstruction and breathing difficulties. Emphysema, ulcerative colitis, and asthma are all indications of COPD.   Smoking is the most common cause of COPD. Smoking is responsible for up to 80% of COPD-related fatalities. However, one out of every four Americans with COPD has never smoked (Mayo Clinic, n.d., Coped – Symptoms and Causes) … The best approach to avoid COPD is to never smoke cigarettes and to quit if you already do. Consult your doctor about programmers and items that might assist you in quitting smoking. Also, avoid secondhand smoke, which comes from the combustion of tobacco products like cigarettes and pipes.

Cancer

Cancer is a group of illnesses in which aberrant cells divide out of control and spread to other parts of the body. Toxins in tobacco smoke can impair the immune system, making it more difficult to fight cancer cells. When this happens, cancer cells continue to proliferate unabated. Tobacco smoke contains poisons that can harm or alter a cell’s DNA. DNA serves as a cell’s “instruction manual,” guiding its proper development and function (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010). When a cell’s DNA is broken, it might start to grow out of control, resulting in a cancer tumor. Your chances of developing cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder are decreased in half within five years after stopping. If nobody smoked, one of every three cancer deaths in the United States would not happen. One out of every three cancer deaths in the United States could be avoided if no one smoked.

NURS FPX 4060 Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

SLIDE 5. WHY QUIT?

In the U. S., tobacco smoking is the leading avoidable cause of death (Healthy People 2020, 2020). People starting smoking in youth are more likely to develop a nicotine addiction as adults. (Healthy People 2020, 2020; Healthy People 2020, 2020; Healthy People 2020, 2020; Healthy People 2020 Quitting smoking lowers the risk of long-term sickness and illness significantly (Healthy People 2020, 2020). The average annual cost of smoke is $2,292, with a ten-year cost of $22,920. You’ll also be safeguarding the health of your non-smoking friends and family by quitting smoking. Lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, and stroke are all increased by inhaling secondhand smoking. It raises the risk of lung diseases in patients, such as bronchitis, sore throats, coughing, and asthma. After stopping, you’ll feel better; you won’t cough as much, won’t get as many mouth ulcers or clogged noses, and you’ll have more energy and exercise tolerance.

SLIDE 6. Healthy People 2020/2030

Healthy People 2020/2030 lays forth goals for reducing disease and mortality caused by tobacco use. The government’s Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion maintains this site, which attempts to educate the public in order to promote a healthier nation. It promotes cross-community collaboration, aims to empower individuals to make informed health decisions, and assesses the impact of intervention efforts. This site provides evidence-based treatments and guidelines for reducing tobacco product consumption, with our objectives matched with those of healthy people.

The task was for the committee to create five Healthy People 2020/2030 goals that would be used in the promotion. “Reducing the number of persons exposed to secondhand smoke,” “Stopping young individuals,” “helping to promote a healthy lifestyle,” “awareness,” and “reduce the usage of tobacco products overall” were the group’s top priorities on campus (Lansky, 2020). The goals were again realistic, quantifiable, and had a 60-day time limit with a 30-day progress review. Let’s take a look at our performance over the previous 30 days.

SLIDE 7. Raising Awareness

We made the educational posters and brochures to raise awareness about these health issues and received authorization to distribute the materials. You appear to have scored on every point on the goal. People are seeing the materials, according to the first three weekly polls, but there is no indication that anyone has modified their cigarette habits as a result of the materials. We may change the contents by adding alternative visuals or highlighting the benefits of not using tobacco products, such as how quitting smoking reduces illness or symptom severity. “Smoking cessation lowers your chances of acquiring COPD,” for example.

SLIDE 8. Secondhand Smoke

Even if they never smoke, those who are exposed to secondhand smoke have a substantial chance of getting a tobacco-related disease. Nicotine heart disease kills 34,000 people prematurely each year due to secondhand smoking. Furthermore, secondhand smoking causes 7,300 lung cancer fatalities and 8,000 stroke deaths per year (Healthy People 2020/ 2030, 2021). Your first Healthy People objective was to cut down on secondhand smoking exposure. This is a significant goal since it encompasses more than what one individual decides to do about their body. Second-hand smoke has the same negative consequences as smoking. This may also draw attention to the fact that smoking interferes with other people’s decisions. You’ve made a significant improvement in this area. You made it happen by going to the commons board. Except for certain specified places, the campus is smoke-free as of two days ago. This will decrease secondhand smoke exposure and the health problems that come with it. We did an excellent job!

SLIDE 9. Healthy Lifestyle

This may also point out the fact that smoking interferes with other people’s decisions. You’ve made a significant improvement in this area. You made it happen by going to the commons board. Except for certain specified places, the campus is smoke-free as of two days ago. This will decrease secondhand smoke exposure and the health problems that come with it. You did an excellent job! You developed educational posters and brochures to raise awareness about these health issues and received authorization to distribute the materials. You appear to have scored on every point on the goal. People are seeing the materials, according to the first three weekly polls, but there is no indication that anyone has modified their cigarette habits as a result of the materials. We may change the contents by adding alternative visuals or highlighting the benefits of not using tobacco products, such as how quitting smoking reduces illness or symptom severity. “Smoking cessation lowers your chances of acquiring COPD,” for example.

NURS FPX 4060 Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

SLIDE 10. Stopping Young Individuals From Smoking

We began the instruction sessions at the high school institution with the selection of young pupils who are likely to use cigarettes in the future. The seminars will aim to prevent young pupils from becoming addicted to cigarettes in the near future. As a result, the health promotion strategy will be expanded to assist more young people, ensuring that tobacco use cessation is taught in a variety of settings and reducing tobacco use considerably. We requested that the institution allow these kids to take part in local and school-sponsored anti-smoking initiatives.

SLIDE 11. Reducing Use

The fifth Healthy People 2020 goal was to minimize tobacco use on campus in general. You supplied the smoking cessation support hotline for this one. The hotline service does inquire as to where the caller obtained the information. When asked about referral information, they agreed to give us with a count of callers who referenced your campaign. However, no identities are included because the information is kept private and anonymous. In the previous month, they received 20 calls. To such a motivated bunch, that may not seem like much, but it is a significant amount. Due to the restricted locations on campus where individuals may smoke, there may be a drop in total smoking.

         SLIDE 12. Results & Outcomes

NURS FPX 4060 Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

The actions you offer are both feasible and measurable. First and foremost, according to the surveys, you have all completely educated yourselves. According to the weekly assessment questionnaires, you informed people about tobacco and tobacco substitute usage, as well as the health risks associated with it. Provide the resources needed for teenage smoking cessation to the adolescent population. Healthy habits should be reinforced. Tobacco use and secondhand smoke are the leading causes of death in the United States. Secondly, our weekly polls and reports from our cooperating representatives in gym and the smoking cessation hotline center show progress toward our Healthy People 2020 targets. On the previous slides, I talked through goal-specific progress. We can keep working toward our objectives until our 60-day deadline, after which we will conduct a thorough assessment of the findings.

  SLIDE 13. How to Improve Future Sessions

NURS FPX 4060 Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

As we learn through the implementation of a plan, it is common for it to require some changes or adjustments. For example, we may include positive impacts of not using tobacco products as well as disease data on flyers and posters to determine whether this improves the impact of such materials on individuals who view them. At the very least, according to the poll, they are aware of them. Families and significant others must now be included in the campaign as well. When pupils are not in school, the individuals they are with should be informed about the dangers of smoking and the advantages of leading a healthy lifestyle. We will give instructional materials for young to take home and share across their communities. 

Our final objective will be 60 days, which will be reached at the end of next month’s meeting. We’ll start by compiling our information to see how far we’ve come. Then we’ll be able to start a fresh campaign. So, starting next couple of days, we’ll add the Healthy People goal of “controlling access to tobacco products for young adults” by minimizing tobacco alternative advertising to young adults by prohibiting the sale of flavored vape pens on college campuses that pique their attention in tobacco products (Healthy People 2020/ 2030, 2021). Keeping track of patient marketing strategies to evaluate what works best and how to apply it to future patients.

By encouraging good behavior and providing examples of healthy habits such as eating healthily, exercising, and working in an atmosphere that supports mental health, teenagers can be successful in quitting smoking. Collaborate with teenagers who have successfully quit smoking to learn about the health inequalities they experienced, so that you may better assist potential adolescents in future sessions.

SLIDE 14. Conclusion

According to the CDC, 5.6 million American teenagers under the age of 18 would likely die young as a result of a smoking-related disease if they continue to smoke at their present pace (COPD, 2021). Tobacco and tobacco substitute usage has been linked to a number of severe diseases and deaths. If these items are not used, these problems can be avoided. This may be accomplished through educating ourselves and others as part of a complete strategy with realistic, attainable objectives. Living a healthy lifestyle and sharing it with our loved ones and peers, as well as surrounding ourselves with healthy tobacco-free people, will assist us in making good decisions. Thank you.

References

NURS FPX 4060 Assessment 4 Health Promotion Plan Presentation

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Loukas, A., Chow, S., Pasch, K. E., Li, X., Hinds III, J. T., Marti, C., Harrell, M. B., Creamer, M. R., & Perry, C. L. (2016). College students’ protobacco use, cigarette cessation, and dependence. American Journal of Health Behavior, 40(4), 514–522. https://doi.org/10.5993/ajhb.40.4.13

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